Question: Can I Take My Newborn Grocery Shopping?

Is it safe to go to grocery stores during the COVID-19 pandemic and what precautions should I take?

Yes, it is generally safe to go grocery shopping and to markets by following the below prevention measures:• Clean your hands with sanitizer before entering the store.• Cover a cough or sneeze in your bent elbow or tissue.• Maintain at least a 1-metre distance from others, and if you can’t maintain this distance, wear a mask (many stores now require a mask).• Once home, wash your hands thoroughly and also after handling and storing your purchased products.

There is currently no confirmed case of COVID-19 transmitted through food or food packaging..

Can I touch and hold my newborn baby if I have COVID-19?

Yes. Close contact and early, exclusive breastfeeding helps a baby to thrive. You should be supported to• Breastfeed safely, with good respiratory hygiene;• Hold your newborn skin-to-skin, and• Share a room with your baby• You should wash your hands before and after touching your baby, and keep all surfaces clean. Mothers with symptoms of COVID-19 are advised to wear a medical mask, during any contact with the baby.

What is the incubation period of the coronavirus disease?

The incubation period of COVID-19, which is the time between exposure to the virus and symptom onset, is on average 5-6 days, but can be as long as 14 days. Thus, quarantine should be in place for 14 days from the last exposure to a confirmed case.

Should you meet with other people during the COVID-19 pandemic?

In this difficult period it is best to meet virtually but if you have to meet others, do it carefully and with the right precautions.

Can the coronavirus spread via feces?

There is some evidence that COVID-19 infection may lead to intestinal infection and be present in faeces. However, to date only one study has cultured the COVID-19 virus from a single stool specimen. There have been no reports of faecal−oral transmission of the COVID-19 virus to date.

Who is at risk for coronavirus?

See full answerThe virus that causes COVID-19 infects people of all ages. However, evidence to date suggests that two groups of people are at a higher risk of getting severe COVID-19 disease. These are older people (that is people over 60 years old); and those with underlying medical conditions (such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer). The risk of severe disease gradually increases with age starting from around 40 years. It’s important that adults in this age range protect themselves and in turn protect others that may be more vulnerable.WHO has issued advice for these two groups and for community support to ensure that they are protected from COVID-19 without being isolated, stigmatized, left in a position of increased vulnerability or unable to access basic provisions and social care.

Can the COVID-19 virus be spread through breastmilk?

The COVID-19 virus has not been detected in the breastmilk of any mother with confirmed and suspected COVID-19 and there is no evidence so far that the virus is transmitted through breastfeeding. Researchers continue to test breastmilk from mothers with the infection.

What is the most likely ecological reservoirs for coronavirus disease?

The most likely ecological reservoirs for SARS-CoV-2 are bats, but it is believed that the virus jumped the species barrier to humans from another intermediate animal host. This intermediate animal host could be a domestic food animal, a wild animal, or a domesticated wild animal which has not yet been identified.

What are some of the symptoms of COVID-19?

Most people who are infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus have respiratory symptoms. They start to feel a little bit unwell, they will have a fever, they may have a cough or a sore throat or sneeze. In some individuals, they may have gastrointestinal symptoms. Others may lose the sense of smell or the sense of taste.

What are foods to avoid during the COVID-19 pandemic?

See full answerReduce foods such as red and fatty meats, butter and full-fat dairy products, palm oil, coconut oil, solid shortening and lard. Avoid trans fats as much as possible. Read nutrition labels to ensure that partially hydrogenated oils are not listed in the ingredients. If food labels are not available, avoid foods which commonly contain trans fats such as processed and fried foods, like doughnuts and baked goods – including biscuits, pie crusts, frozen pizzas, cookies, crackers and margarines that include partially hydrogenated fat.If in doubt, minimally processed foods and ingredients are better choices. Consume enough fibre Fibre contributes to a healthy digestive system and offers a prolonged feeling of fullness, which helps prevent overeating.